Category: Guest Posts

Vocation, Big Picture, & Integration

Vocation, Big Picture, & Integration

It is hard not to feel demoralized, disempowered, or skeptical about the world today. Who doesn’t want things to be better or work towards improving them? But the path to a new and better reality cannot be one of avoidance.

Q&A With Michael I. Kueber

Q&A With Michael I. Kueber

The faith is alive in the first generation immigrants. They believe deeply in Jesus Christ and his blessed mother Mary. They want to see the power of God manifested in their families.

Q&A with Christopher Sheklian

Q&A with Christopher Sheklian

Armenian theologians have been reading and responding to developments in Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Protestant theological thought for a long time, now. My hope is that SNTR will provide new insights into longstanding concerns from an understudied Christian tradition outside the “mainstream,” while simultaneously enlarging our sense of what constitutes that mainstream.

Q&A with Grant Kaplan

Q&A with Grant Kaplan

The conversation has not stopped, and it will continue. Here I do not mean to suggest any futility; these interventions helped many avoid error and come to see how faith can be intelligible. New discoveries will continue to create new urgencies to think anew about this relationship.

Keith J. Egan on Carmelite Identity

Keith J. Egan on Carmelite Identity

No charism is a one and done process, but like the reform of the church, a charism is an ongoing process of listening attentively and lovingly to the Holy Spirit who is, as John of the Cross says, the principal guide of those committed to prayer and to the apostolate.

Q&A with Barbara Mattick

Q&A with Barbara Mattick

As immigrants, the sisters were not familiar with American culture and history, but that lack of understanding also meant that they were not hindered by baggage associated with the Civil War and negative attitudes about black people.

Q&A with Lucas Briola

Q&A with Lucas Briola

The Eucharistic celebration contains the solution to the violence of technocratic modernity and grounds the many calls in the encyclical to care for our common home in all its facets, from the unborn to non-human creation.

Q&A with Michael T. Rizzi

Q&A with Michael T. Rizzi

All Jesuit colleges had to survive, and the population of their local communities helped to shape their decisions. Western schools like Seattle University were pioneers in admitting women partly because they were located in smaller, less developed cities where the male population was limited.

Q&A With Juan R. Vélez

Q&A With Juan R. Vélez

One of the characteristics of the volume is that the contributions represent a wide range of methodologies according to the field of learning of each contributor.

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