Category: Book Features

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

One of the most important, but also most challenging arguments in the book is that the actions of rational, free agents (like humans and God) are what they are because of what the agent means by them. And so while the first half of the book is concerned with a metaphysical question about how it can be that God acts in human action, in the second half, we eventually turn to the question, what is God doing in human action? And this question requires that theology be not only a metaphysical enterprise, but also a hermeneutical one. In other words, we need to be able to interpret what God means by what God is doing in human action. And because the earlier part of the book establishes that there are not parts of creation where God is not acting—God, after all, is the maker of “all things”—that means that the data for this hermeneutical project are given not just in some particular “religious” area of human action, nor in one particular institution or one culture or one community, but in and through all of the product of human action in every human community in every place and every time. It means that the theological enterprise, considered at its most fundamental level (and my book is probably best understood as a work of “fundamental theology”), is as wide and deep and tall as human history itself.

Excerpt from Trinitarian Ecclesiology

Excerpt from Trinitarian Ecclesiology

Venerable Fulton Sheen once famously said that “there are not one hundred people in the United States who hate the Catholic Church,  but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be—which is, of course, quite a different thing.” This is true for people of every nation of the world throughout history  since the Church’s founding by Christ. Although the Catholic Church  exists in the world and is encountered by people of every nation and  tongue, her true nature and mission is nevertheless opaque to most,  especially in our modern world that rejects not only divine revelation  but even natural knowledge of God obtainable by reason. Rather than  perceiving a mystery that contains the presence of God and provides  us with the means to attain our perfect happiness in him, many see  the Church as an outdated human institution that limits, and even  threatens, our freedom. This raises the question of the proper understanding of the  Church. What is the nature of the Church and what is her mission?  Charles Cardinal Journet, who authored a scientific and sapiential  treatise on the Church in the last century, L’Église du Verbe incarné,  outlines three different ways of perceiving the Church that correspond to how one regards Christ.

Q&A with James Matthew Wilson

Q&A with James Matthew Wilson

MacGreevy’s poetry and criticism redescribes the modern world in terms of Augustine’s theory of the Two Cities. Coffey, who studied with Maritain and at one point taught Aquinas at Saint Louis University, saw the neo-Thomist revival as a way to save modern persons from the suicide of Kantian idealism; Aquinas’s understanding of being as gift, as intelligible and so capable of giving itself, by way of form, to be known by intellects saves us from solipsism, skepticism, and madness. For MacGreevy and Coffey, Samuel Beckett represented that fateful solipsism if Aquinas’s insights were ignored. Go figure. They were very close friends. Coffey and Beckett were even golf partners. It would be hard to understand the meaning of Beckett’s work without seeing how it engaged, and was fruitfully engaged by, Coffey’s Thomistic philosophy. For Devlin, Michel de Montaigne and Blaise Pascal understood the modern age as few others could. They saw the chaos of historical experience and realized that mankind could not be saved by any external development, including political justice.

Q&A with Miriam de Cock and Elizabeth Klein

Q&A with Miriam de Cock and Elizabeth Klein

We hope that our essays demonstrate that despite their use of allegory or the like these authors did not treat scripture in an arbitrary manner, reading into the text whatever they saw fit, but rather, they worked within well-established paradigms inherited by their training in the pagan Greco-Roman schoolrooms of grammar and rhetoric. These ancient Christian authors were also those who worked with scripture carefully as they articulated some of the most foundational teachings of the Christian tradition, such as the relationship between the Father and the Son or the two natures of Christ. 

Excerpt of One Poor Scruple

Excerpt of One Poor Scruple

A change almost too subtle to be described passed over her companion’s face. It was only a slight contraction of delicate lines about the long narrow eyes, denoting an increase of interest and alertness at this announcement. She was sitting on a low chair, nearer to the fire than her visitor. She now turned towards her, as if expecting to hear more.

Fall/Winter 2023-2024 Catalog is Out NOW

Fall/Winter 2023-2024 Catalog is Out NOW

The CUA Press is pleased to kick off our new book season with the release of our Fall/Winter 2023-2024 catalog! Here are just a few of the exciting upcoming titles you can look forward to reading.

Excerpt of Slavery and the Catholic Church in the United States

Excerpt of Slavery and the Catholic Church in the United States

In the Catholic Church of the early nineteenth century, no formal and absolute condemnation of slavery as an institution existed. Although recognizing abuses in the system, the Church did not see slavery as a moral evil in itself but as a result of original sin.

Excerpt of The Relic

Excerpt of The Relic

They got married. I was born on a Good Friday afternoon, and Mama died on the joyous morning of the Resurrection amid the hallelujah fireworks. Covered with gillyflowers, she lies in the cemetery of Viana do Castelo, in a humid lane near the wall shadowed by weeping willows, where she liked taking summer afternoon walks with her shaggy little dog named Traviata.

Excerpt of The Power of Patristic Preaching

Excerpt of The Power of Patristic Preaching

Many of us who have been called to evangelize and build up the Church by life and speech want to address the frustrations that upset so many people. We want them to experience the Word through our speaking and living, and we also—sinful, broken creatures ourselves—want to hold fast to the Word.

Excerpt of Catholicism and Liberal Democracy

Excerpt of Catholicism and Liberal Democracy

Yet those who lament these enduring “religious conflicts,” previously theorized as a phenomenon which, together with religion itself, would diminish and then disappear with modernization and secularization, are confronted by the stubborn presence of religious believers in contemporary democracies.

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