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Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

One of the most important, but also most challenging arguments in the book is that the actions of rational, free agents (like humans and God) are what they are because of what the agent means by them. And so while the first half of the book is concerned with a metaphysical question about how it can be that God acts in human action, in the second half, we eventually turn to the question, what is God doing in human action? And this question requires that theology be not only a metaphysical enterprise, but also a hermeneutical one. In other words, we need to be able to interpret what God means by what God is doing in human action. And because the earlier part of the book establishes that there are not parts of creation where God is not acting—God, after all, is the maker of “all things”—that means that the data for this hermeneutical project are given not just in some particular “religious” area of human action, nor in one particular institution or one culture or one community, but in and through all of the product of human action in every human community in every place and every time. It means that the theological enterprise, considered at its most fundamental level (and my book is probably best understood as a work of “fundamental theology”), is as wide and deep and tall as human history itself.

Excerpt from Trinitarian Ecclesiology

Excerpt from Trinitarian Ecclesiology

Venerable Fulton Sheen once famously said that “there are not one hundred people in the United States who hate the Catholic Church,  but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be—which is, of course, quite a different thing.” This is true for people of every nation of the world throughout history  since the Church’s founding by Christ. Although the Catholic Church  exists in the world and is encountered by people of every nation and  tongue, her true nature and mission is nevertheless opaque to most,  especially in our modern world that rejects not only divine revelation  but even natural knowledge of God obtainable by reason. Rather than  perceiving a mystery that contains the presence of God and provides  us with the means to attain our perfect happiness in him, many see  the Church as an outdated human institution that limits, and even  threatens, our freedom. This raises the question of the proper understanding of the  Church. What is the nature of the Church and what is her mission?  Charles Cardinal Journet, who authored a scientific and sapiential  treatise on the Church in the last century, L’Église du Verbe incarné,  outlines three different ways of perceiving the Church that correspond to how one regards Christ.

Q&A with Matt Hoven

Q&A with Matt Hoven

The book shows readers the lived faith of a religious priest in a hockey setting. We find how religious faith has to bring to the public square, whether in its devotion to ageless values or in its belief in transcendence. We discover a religious faith that is rooted in developing human persons, whether in schools, colleges, or ice rinks. We see the human side of religion, one that tries to understand the implications of faith in the real world. For instance, Bauer critiques an overemphasis on skill development in sport because he believes that it limits—even denies—the flourishing of the human person, where players overemphasize know-how without considering their purpose for playing the game.

Q&A with John Meinert

Q&A with John Meinert

I began to see that even though Aquinas does not spend a lot of time disputing and writing about peace, it is central to his work. It is ultimately the mission of God and so it becomes our mission as well. Aquinas is very explicit on this point and that has personally impacted me deeply. These are, likewise, the two things I hope the reader finds as well, a new appreciation for Aquinas’s works as well as a deeper love and greater commitment to the God of peace. 

Staff Bookshelf March 2024

Staff Bookshelf March 2024

We are welcoming the warmer weather here at the Press, alongside new reads and new faces—including Journals Coordinator, Rachel Daley! Featured in this staff bookshelf we have a lovely variety of genres, some of which include fantasy, spirituality, historical fiction, nonfiction, and even theology!

Q&A with James Matthew Wilson

Q&A with James Matthew Wilson

MacGreevy’s poetry and criticism redescribes the modern world in terms of Augustine’s theory of the Two Cities. Coffey, who studied with Maritain and at one point taught Aquinas at Saint Louis University, saw the neo-Thomist revival as a way to save modern persons from the suicide of Kantian idealism; Aquinas’s understanding of being as gift, as intelligible and so capable of giving itself, by way of form, to be known by intellects saves us from solipsism, skepticism, and madness. For MacGreevy and Coffey, Samuel Beckett represented that fateful solipsism if Aquinas’s insights were ignored. Go figure. They were very close friends. Coffey and Beckett were even golf partners. It would be hard to understand the meaning of Beckett’s work without seeing how it engaged, and was fruitfully engaged by, Coffey’s Thomistic philosophy. For Devlin, Michel de Montaigne and Blaise Pascal understood the modern age as few others could. They saw the chaos of historical experience and realized that mankind could not be saved by any external development, including political justice.

Excerpt From New FOTC Volume: Commentary on the Songs of Songs by Rupert Deutz— Translated by Jieon Kim and Vittorio Hosle. Introduction by Vittorio Hosle.

Excerpt From New FOTC Volume: Commentary on the Songs of Songs by Rupert Deutz— Translated by Jieon Kim and Vittorio Hosle. Introduction by Vittorio Hosle.

This is the first English translation of a major work by Rupert of Deutz, arguably the most prolific Christian author since Augustine. During his lifetime, which spanned the eleventh and twelfth centuries, Rupert engaged in controversies on the Eucharist and on predestination and composed works on the Trinity, salvation in Christ, and other major theological topics.

Q&A with Rick Barry

Q&A with Rick Barry

A major goal of this book is to counter this misguided understanding and to invite the reader to enter the world of the ancient Israelite priests, where we discover a vision that is beautiful, challenging, and profoundly relevant for contemporary Christians. What’s more, when we fully immerse ourselves in ancient Jewish temple theology, our appreciation for Christ’s saving work is also dramatically enhanced.

Q&A with Fr. Ryan Connors

Q&A with Fr. Ryan Connors

We were delighted to have Fr. Ryan Connors on our blog to discuss his book Rethinking Cooperation with Evil: A Virtue-Based Approach. Fr. Ryan Connors is a priest of the Diocese of Providence (RI) and professor of moral theology at St. John’s Seminary (Boston).

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