Tag: theology

The Catholic University of America Press is pleased to announce a publishing agreement with Ediciones Rialp, a Spanish-language publisher based in Madrid

Q&A with David Foley

Q&A with David Foley

We are delighted to have David Foley on our blog to discuss his book Peter Comestor’s Lectures on the Glossed Gospel of John: A Study with a Critical Edition and Translation. Peter Comestor (1100-1178) was a twelfth-century French theological writer and university teacher. David Foley has a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in Medieval Studies and is a translator for Angelus Press, Saskatoon, Canada.

Excerpt of From the Dust of the Earth

Excerpt of From the Dust of the Earth

Following Ratzinger’s lead, I would say that the question ought not to be how we can defend the faithful against the advances of this science but rather how we can engage in dialogue with it so as to more deeply penetrate the mysteries of the Christian faith and, in turn, illumine the science with our faith.

Q&A with William H. Marshner

Q&A with William H. Marshner

We are delighted to have William H. Marshner join us on the blog to discuss his newly released translation of Cardinal Cajetan’s Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae: Prima Pars. The translation is divided into three separate free-standing volumes. William H. Marshner is Professor Emeritus of Theology, Christendom College, and the editor and translator of Defending the Faith: An Anti-Modernist Anthology (CUA Press).  

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

One of the most important, but also most challenging arguments in the book is that the actions of rational, free agents (like humans and God) are what they are because of what the agent means by them. And so while the first half of the book is concerned with a metaphysical question about how it can be that God acts in human action, in the second half, we eventually turn to the question, what is God doing in human action? And this question requires that theology be not only a metaphysical enterprise, but also a hermeneutical one. In other words, we need to be able to interpret what God means by what God is doing in human action. And because the earlier part of the book establishes that there are not parts of creation where God is not acting—God, after all, is the maker of “all things”—that means that the data for this hermeneutical project are given not just in some particular “religious” area of human action, nor in one particular institution or one culture or one community, but in and through all of the product of human action in every human community in every place and every time. It means that the theological enterprise, considered at its most fundamental level (and my book is probably best understood as a work of “fundamental theology”), is as wide and deep and tall as human history itself.

Excerpt from Trinitarian Ecclesiology

Excerpt from Trinitarian Ecclesiology

Venerable Fulton Sheen once famously said that “there are not one hundred people in the United States who hate the Catholic Church,  but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be—which is, of course, quite a different thing.” This is true for people of every nation of the world throughout history  since the Church’s founding by Christ. Although the Catholic Church  exists in the world and is encountered by people of every nation and  tongue, her true nature and mission is nevertheless opaque to most,  especially in our modern world that rejects not only divine revelation  but even natural knowledge of God obtainable by reason. Rather than  perceiving a mystery that contains the presence of God and provides  us with the means to attain our perfect happiness in him, many see  the Church as an outdated human institution that limits, and even  threatens, our freedom. This raises the question of the proper understanding of the  Church. What is the nature of the Church and what is her mission?  Charles Cardinal Journet, who authored a scientific and sapiential  treatise on the Church in the last century, L’Église du Verbe incarné,  outlines three different ways of perceiving the Church that correspond to how one regards Christ.

Q&A with John Meinert

Q&A with John Meinert

I began to see that even though Aquinas does not spend a lot of time disputing and writing about peace, it is central to his work. It is ultimately the mission of God and so it becomes our mission as well. Aquinas is very explicit on this point and that has personally impacted me deeply. These are, likewise, the two things I hope the reader finds as well, a new appreciation for Aquinas’s works as well as a deeper love and greater commitment to the God of peace. 

Staff Bookshelf March 2024

Staff Bookshelf March 2024

We are welcoming the warmer weather here at the Press, alongside new reads and new faces—including Journals Coordinator, Rachel Daley! Featured in this staff bookshelf we have a lovely variety of genres, some of which include fantasy, spirituality, historical fiction, nonfiction, and even theology!

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