Tag: theology

Excerpt From New FOTC Volume: Commentary on the Songs of Songs by Rupert Deutz— Translated by Jieon Kim and Vittorio Hosle. Introduction by Vittorio Hosle.

Excerpt From New FOTC Volume: Commentary on the Songs of Songs by Rupert Deutz— Translated by Jieon Kim and Vittorio Hosle. Introduction by Vittorio Hosle.

This is the first English translation of a major work by Rupert of Deutz, arguably the most prolific Christian author since Augustine. During his lifetime, which spanned the eleventh and twelfth centuries, Rupert engaged in controversies on the Eucharist and on predestination and composed works on the Trinity, salvation in Christ, and other major theological topics.

Q&A with Rick Barry

Q&A with Rick Barry

A major goal of this book is to counter this misguided understanding and to invite the reader to enter the world of the ancient Israelite priests, where we discover a vision that is beautiful, challenging, and profoundly relevant for contemporary Christians. What’s more, when we fully immerse ourselves in ancient Jewish temple theology, our appreciation for Christ’s saving work is also dramatically enhanced.

Q&A with Fr. Ryan Connors

Q&A with Fr. Ryan Connors

We were delighted to have Fr. Ryan Connors on our blog to discuss his book Rethinking Cooperation with Evil: A Virtue-Based Approach. Fr. Ryan Connors is a priest of the Diocese of Providence (RI) and professor of moral theology at St. John’s Seminary (Boston).

Staff Bookshelf January 2024

Staff Bookshelf January 2024

In this blog post, we are taking a look at what CUA Press is reading this January— kicking off the new year with new reads! Featured in this staff bookshelf we have a lovely variety of genres, some of which include fantasy, spirituality, historical fiction, nonfiction, and even theology!

Q&A with Miriam de Cock and Elizabeth Klein

Q&A with Miriam de Cock and Elizabeth Klein

We hope that our essays demonstrate that despite their use of allegory or the like these authors did not treat scripture in an arbitrary manner, reading into the text whatever they saw fit, but rather, they worked within well-established paradigms inherited by their training in the pagan Greco-Roman schoolrooms of grammar and rhetoric. These ancient Christian authors were also those who worked with scripture carefully as they articulated some of the most foundational teachings of the Christian tradition, such as the relationship between the Father and the Son or the two natures of Christ. 

Q&A with Thomas Izbicki

Q&A with Thomas Izbicki

The reader should come to understand why ministry to the sick was done. How could sin cause illness? How were sins removed, especially the sins of the dying, through reception of the sacraments?

Q&A with Montague Brown

Q&A with Montague Brown

The Saint Anselm Journal publishes both historically based articles on Anselm—along with his predecessors, and those he influenced—and systematic articles on topics of interest to him, such as what we can know about God, the reality of human freedom, and the relations between of faith and reason in the dynamic Catholic intellectual tradition of faith seeking understanding. These systematic articles include studies from the whole history of philosophy and theology.

Q&A with Henry Ansgar Kelly

Q&A with Henry Ansgar Kelly

By showing what happens in individual trials of all sorts, the book covers a great deal of social and ecclesiastical and political history.

Q&A with Amanda Bresie

Q&A with Amanda Bresie

My hope, though, is that the story of a group of women who dared to change the world–even with flawed methods–shines through. As I say in the book, “The history of race, gender, and religion in America is a complicated on that has kept scholars busy for years. . . . Drexel and the SBS saw things more simply. They witnessed inequality and prejudice and sought to use their Catholic faith to expand the definition of who got to be an American. It was other people who made it complicated.”

Q&A with David Kwon

Q&A with David Kwon

My overarching aim as a moral theologian and war/peace ethicist is to find ways of bridging these divides and work for the common good. This commitment aligns with my conviction: “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God” (Mt 5:9).

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