Tag: philosophy

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

Q&A with Jonathan R. Heaps

One of the most important, but also most challenging arguments in the book is that the actions of rational, free agents (like humans and God) are what they are because of what the agent means by them. And so while the first half of the book is concerned with a metaphysical question about how it can be that God acts in human action, in the second half, we eventually turn to the question, what is God doing in human action? And this question requires that theology be not only a metaphysical enterprise, but also a hermeneutical one. In other words, we need to be able to interpret what God means by what God is doing in human action. And because the earlier part of the book establishes that there are not parts of creation where God is not acting—God, after all, is the maker of “all things”—that means that the data for this hermeneutical project are given not just in some particular “religious” area of human action, nor in one particular institution or one culture or one community, but in and through all of the product of human action in every human community in every place and every time. It means that the theological enterprise, considered at its most fundamental level (and my book is probably best understood as a work of “fundamental theology”), is as wide and deep and tall as human history itself.

Q&A with John Meinert

Q&A with John Meinert

I began to see that even though Aquinas does not spend a lot of time disputing and writing about peace, it is central to his work. It is ultimately the mission of God and so it becomes our mission as well. Aquinas is very explicit on this point and that has personally impacted me deeply. These are, likewise, the two things I hope the reader finds as well, a new appreciation for Aquinas’s works as well as a deeper love and greater commitment to the God of peace. 

Q&A with David Kwon

Q&A with David Kwon

My overarching aim as a moral theologian and war/peace ethicist is to find ways of bridging these divides and work for the common good. This commitment aligns with my conviction: “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God” (Mt 5:9).

Q&A with Marial Corona

Q&A with Marial Corona

We were pleased to chat with Marial Corona about her research on John Newman’s life and contributions to theological and philosophical study, which is the focus of her book The Philosophy of John Henry Newman and Pragmatism. Corona completed her Master’s thesis on Newman’s educational ideas during her time at Notre Dame University (2003-2009). Corona is an adjunct professor for the Institute of Pastoral Studies at Loyola University Chicago.

Celebrating Blaise Pascal’s 400th Birthday

Celebrating Blaise Pascal’s 400th Birthday

This year, June 19th will mark the 400th birthday of the great French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal. Pascal’s name and work is no stranger to the CUA Press catalog, so today we want to create our own Blaise Pascal Reader for those who want to learn more about the great intellectual and his work.

Q&A with Grant Kaplan

Q&A with Grant Kaplan

The conversation has not stopped, and it will continue. Here I do not mean to suggest any futility; these interventions helped many avoid error and come to see how faith can be intelligible. New discoveries will continue to create new urgencies to think anew about this relationship.

Q&A With Juan R. Vélez

Q&A With Juan R. Vélez

One of the characteristics of the volume is that the contributions represent a wide range of methodologies according to the field of learning of each contributor.

Women and Men are of Equal Dignity with Some Important Differences

Women and Men are of Equal Dignity with Some Important Differences

In working with and reading my co-authors, I came to a deeper appreciation of just how important our male and female bodies are. Major movements today claim not only that there is no longer a male or female nature, but—even more extreme—some claim that there is no basic human nature at all.

Q&A with Mary J. Brown

Q&A with Mary J. Brown

The University of Dayton controversy continued to escalate because the faculty did not discuss things in a civil manner. When people hold deeply-felt concerns on moral issues, they are willing to do things that seem unimaginable to others, such as report their fellow faculty to the archbishop.

Book Backstory with James Jacobs

Book Backstory with James Jacobs

I majored in philosophy as an undergraduate, and had done two years of theology at a seminary, and so—on paper—I appeared well prepared to teach this class. However, since the philosophy I had learned was modern atheistic philosophy, I struggled to communicate the truth while I tried to complete my education by teaching myself the splendors of the perennial tradition.

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