Tag: guest post

Q&A with David J. Endres

Q&A with David J. Endres

Perhaps it is obvious, but I believe that we need to know each other’s histories. American Catholics can be pretty tribal—within neighborhoods, parishes, and ethnic communities. But I think that we can benefit from the experiences of others, no matter our backgrounds.

The Lost Women of the Catholic Literary Revival

The Lost Women of the Catholic Literary Revival

The women writers of the Catholic Literary Revival were in their own time well-known and well-read, with no shortage of best-selling authors among their ranks. Most predated and greatly influenced Waugh and Greene. They wrote from a more diverse range of social and political positions than Waugh and Greene, and were often more radical in their use of ninetheenth- and twenthieth-century literary innovations.

Q&A with Joseph Stuart

Q&A with Joseph Stuart

Sociologists like Margaret Archer have commented on the lack of analytical terms for designating the components of culture. Yet Dawson’s approach to culture provides those terms. They help to coordinate research in terms of the big picture. These elements of culture prevent scholars from neglecting important data sets or spiritual influences.

Women and Men are of Equal Dignity with Some Important Differences

Women and Men are of Equal Dignity with Some Important Differences

In working with and reading my co-authors, I came to a deeper appreciation of just how important our male and female bodies are. Major movements today claim not only that there is no longer a male or female nature, but—even more extreme—some claim that there is no basic human nature at all.

Q&A with Mary J. Brown

Q&A with Mary J. Brown

The University of Dayton controversy continued to escalate because the faculty did not discuss things in a civil manner. When people hold deeply-felt concerns on moral issues, they are willing to do things that seem unimaginable to others, such as report their fellow faculty to the archbishop.

Book Backstory with James Jacobs

Book Backstory with James Jacobs

I majored in philosophy as an undergraduate, and had done two years of theology at a seminary, and so—on paper—I appeared well prepared to teach this class. However, since the philosophy I had learned was modern atheistic philosophy, I struggled to communicate the truth while I tried to complete my education by teaching myself the splendors of the perennial tradition.

Q&A with Ty P. Monroe

Q&A with Ty P. Monroe

In his best moments, Augustine persistently reminds us that the sacraments are in some sense objectively effective apart from or prior to us, the recipients, at least insofar as we don’t generate their saving grace. Yet he also shows why and how the sacraments are always brought to their full effect when we subjectively receive that grace and act on it in our lived experience.

Book Backstory with Lee Oser

Book Backstory with Lee Oser

It was a challenge to leave the enclaves of modernist literature, where my work was generally accepted, to face rejection as a novice in the world of Shakespeare studies. I suffered many embarrassments before I learned to defend and advance the positions I take in this book.

Q&A with Laura Pooley

Q&A with Laura Pooley

My main aim in producing the workbook was to make available to others the experience which I had been privileged enough to enjoy in Rome. The biggest challenge was to keep Reggie’s voice as strong and authentic and pure as possible, whilst making something which worked for the widest possible audience in print.

Filter by Month

Categories