Tag: catholic

Excerpt of Faith and Reason through Christian History

Excerpt of Faith and Reason through Christian History

The figure of Gal­ileo, whispering his conviction of heliocentrism in a theocratic Italian court, represents in the minds of many modern people their image of an intrinsic conflict between faith and science, dogma and free enquiry, medieval justice and modern values. As numerous scholars have shown, however, the Galileo trial was largely an anomaly in the history of Catholicism. In the early modern period, it was far more common for religious institutions, especially the Catholic Church, to embrace with zeal the latest scientific discoveries, which by and large confirmed their worldview.

Q&A with David J. Endres

Q&A with David J. Endres

Perhaps it is obvious, but I believe that we need to know each other’s histories. American Catholics can be pretty tribal—within neighborhoods, parishes, and ethnic communities. But I think that we can benefit from the experiences of others, no matter our backgrounds.

Books on Vatican II

Books on Vatican II

The Second Vatican Council began on this day in 1962. Now, 60 years later, we’re still grasping the impact of this monumental event in church history. Here are some of the CUA Press titles that mark the path, proceedings, and aftermath of Vatican II.

Excerpt of Faithful Fictions

Excerpt of Faithful Fictions

The image of international Catholicism has itself undergone a change since the Second Vatican Council. The Church began to pay more attention to the individual conscience, to ecumenism, and to social justice, although there has also been fierce resistance to these trends in some quarters. Yet for a long period, Catholicism had seemed powerfully authoritarian and reactionary, and it was understandable that it should have been seen as set against all the social and political developments on which the genre of the novel was held to depend.

Excerpt of Religious Freedom after the Sexual Revolution by Helen Alvaré

Excerpt of Religious Freedom after the Sexual Revolution by Helen Alvaré

Griswold is easily characterized as the case kicking off the Supreme Court’s high level of interest in sexual freedom as individual liberty. There the Court proved willing to create a constitutional right without explicitly supporting constitutional text. This exercise is not only fraught with uncertainty, but easily invites judges to substitute their personal predilections for the actual meaning of the Constitution and at the same time to trespass into the rightful sphere of legislatures.

Q&A with Ty P. Monroe

Q&A with Ty P. Monroe

In his best moments, Augustine persistently reminds us that the sacraments are in some sense objectively effective apart from or prior to us, the recipients, at least insofar as we don’t generate their saving grace. Yet he also shows why and how the sacraments are always brought to their full effect when we subjectively receive that grace and act on it in our lived experience.

Aquinas on the Intersection Between Law and Morality

Aquinas on the Intersection Between Law and Morality

The central aim of my book is to show some of the advantages of taking into consideration Aquinas’s account of the juridical phenomenon in contemporary legal (theoretical and practical) contexts.

Q&A with John Gavin

Q&A with John Gavin

The Church Fathers responded to the spiritual and theological questions of their day—questions that remain present in the hearts of modern Christians. My hope was to recover the Fathers’ wonder and joy before the Word of God and to inspire Christians to share in that same wonder and joy.

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